English

Mission Statement: The English Department aims to educate students to read and think critically, to write and communicate effectively, and to enable students to achieve their educational goals through the principles of the Marianist charism.

Vision Statement: The English Department will prepare students to be lifelong learners and critical thinkers by exploring traditional and non-traditional literature, developing formal and creative writing skills, and learning and implementing research skills. The English Department’s emphasis on critical thinking teaches students ethical discernment in a morally complex world.

Department Chairperson: Mr. Daniel Karcher
314-993-4400 x1218
dkarcher@chaminade-stl.com

Middle School Courses


Listed below are the HIGH SCHOOL English Readiness Concepts integrated in the Middle School English courses.   

Writing process

Development of topics to ensure purpose and focus
Organize writing to ensure best order for unity and coherence
Best use of word choices for style, tone and clarity in sentence structure
Revise sentence structure to include verb tense and conjunctions
Practice correct usage of grammar and punctuation

Reading Process:

Recognize the main idea and intent of the author
Determine supporting details to understand the author’s intended message
Recognize clear cause-effect relationships within a passage
Understand meanings of words in context
Draw generalizations and conclusions about a situation presented in a text

WORD POWER & LITERATURE
ENG 630

Level: 6
Textbook Level: 7
Duration: Two Semesters - 1 Credit
Description:
This course is designed to acquaint students with the literary standards of Chaminade College Preparatory School. The goal of the course is to develop each student’s reading, writing, and critical thinking skills so that he may correctly and confidently express himself. To achieve this goal, the course will guide each student through exercises in grammar, mechanics, sentence structure, paragraph and essay writing, and literature evaluation. Lessons and pedagogy will be tailored to the unique learning styles of boys, and the course’s readings have been chosen to appeal to boys’ interests.

WRITTEN LANGUAGE & LITERATURE
ENG 730

Level:
7
Textbook Level: 8
Duration
: Two Semesters - 1 Credit
Description: The first semester of this class focuses primarily on helping students expand their vocabulary and mastering word meanings and usage. Students will also be exposed to a variety of literary genres focusing primarily on fictional and historical literature. As students read literature they will incorporate the following strategies to analyze the prose. They will discuss why characters act in the prescribed manner, predict outcomes, and make connections between their own experiences and those of the characters. The second and semester focuses on both grammar and writing. Grammar concentrates on parts of speech, phrases, clauses and sentence structure. Students will use these grammatical concepts in the writing process. Initially, students will begin writing power paragraphs. They will then be introduced to the format of the five paragraphs where they will write a character analysis, a poetry explication, and a research paper. Specifics of the writing process include developing the thesis through prewriting, organizing the content by developing detail and supporting commentary, revising and clarifying problems in content or structure, and editing to check for correct grammar, usage and punctuation errors.

LITERATURE & WRITING PROCESS
ENG 830
Level: 8
Textbook Level: 9
Duration: Two Semesters - 1 Credit
Description: This course concentrates on grammar, literature, and writing. Grammar study includes parts of speech, phrases, clauses, and mechanics. Literature includes the study of poetry, drama and the novel. A primary focus of the course is working through the writing process. Writing includes the five paragraph essay, a biographical research essay, and vocabulary.

High School Courses

ACT COLLEGE READINESS CONCEPTS integrated in the High School English course:

Critical Thinking
Reasoning
Problem-Analysis
Writing

ENGLISH 9: SENTENCE TO NOVEL
ENG 130
Level:
9
Duration:
Two Semesters - 1 Credit
Description: This course is designed to teach the Chaminade student the fundamentals of college preparatory writing. It begins with a thorough study of the sentence analysis system. The composition unit focuses on paragraph writing and the development of the various five paragraph essays. Students will write three five-paragraph essays throughout the year. The sentence analysis system is then applied as a viable proof-reading tool. The literature unit covers the novel, short story, and the play.

COMPOSITION
COM 230
Level:
10
Duration: One Semester - ½ Credit
Description: This half credit course focuses on the practical application of locating and correcting common sentence errors and developing a more mature writing style. This process is intended to develop the correctness and maturity of the student's writing style, as well as introduce the MLA format. Simultaneously, students produce four academically useful expository essay patterns: explanatory, contrast, research and argumentative. In addition to teaching organizational patterns, the study emphasizes quality of content and convincing, detailed development. Throughout the study, breaks between sections are used to review correct usage and mechanics as used on the ACT and SAT. The Composition course is required of all sophomores.

AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 230
Level:
10
Duration: Two Semesters - 1 Credit
Description: American Literature is a sophomore level course designed to provide students with an understanding of literary selections written by American authors beginning in the sixteenth century and continuing through the twentieth century. The selections covered encompass a variety of literary genres including the novel, short story, poem, and drama. Students also study vocabulary. In addition, students are required to read novels by contemporary American authors to foster an interest in reading. Summer reading is also a part of this course. 

HONORS AMERICAN LITERATURE
ENG 250
Level:
10
Duration
: Two Semesters - 1 Credit
Prerequisites: Admission to the honors class will be determined by grades, class rank, teacher recommendations, and standardized test scores.
Description: Honors American Literature is a sophomore level course for students of superior abilities. The course is designed to provide students with a deep understanding of literary selections written by American authors. This course emphasizes a close reading of the text and looks at the influence of the writer’s life on the works produced. Selections vary in length and genre and encompass a variety of reading levels. The Honors course distinguishes itself from the regular ENG 230 course by including the study of several novels and the writing of several critical essays on the literature studied. Students also study vocabulary. In addition, students are required to read novels by contemporary American authors to foster an interest in reading. Summer reading is also a part of this course.   

COMPOSITION/LITERATURE
ENG 330
Level: 11
Duration: Two Semesters - 1 Credit
Description: The course consists of approaches to composition and literature with additional attention to vocabulary development which is essential to both pursuits. During the junior year, students are expected to refine composition patterns learned in the sophomore year and to develop alternate strategies of writing which are designed to meet the writing tasks given them. Their most demanding writing job is an8 to 10page research paper in MLA style. The literature study involves a types approach which teaches various methods of analysis designed to enable students to become independent readers, able to appreciate and interpret literature without someone explaining it to them. The intensive vocabulary work is also a major element in the course. This aspect of the study has two purposes: 1) to increase the students' store of available tools for expression, and 2) to improve student scores on the SAT test. Students begin the course using 10 Real SATs, a book published by the College Board. The purpose is to give them practice and to help them learn specific tactics for answering questions they are unsure of. This attention to SAT tests precedes their taking of the PSAT in October.

AP/ACC ENGLISH LANGUAGE AND COMPOSITION
ENG 370

AP: Advanced Placement College Board
ACC: St. Louis University 1818
Level:
11
Duration: Two Semesters - 1 Credit
Prerequisites: Admission to the AP class will be determined by grades, class rank, teacher recommendations, standardized test scores, and a writing sample. An e-mail will be sent to all sophomores with directions for the writing sample. The student must submit the writing sample by the required date to be considered for the AP course. Being in the sophomore honors class is a positive indicator, but it is NOT A REQUIREMENT for entrance into the junior AP course.
Description: The course, designed for students of superior ability, consists of materials and exercises that develop sensitivity to language and composition technique. This course focuses on the concept of purpose: what the writer wants to say to whom and how he designs his work to accomplish his purpose. Several sessions are devoted to answering essay questions from previous AP English Language and Composition exams. Subsequent discussions focus on strategies for answering such questions. In addition, the student spends a good amount of time on the study of usage, diction, and vocabulary--needed preparation for both the AP exam and the SAT test. Students demonstrate their ability by writing a ten page research paper using the MLA style. Finally, the course incorporates a study of British and American literature, to discuss, analyze and evaluate in terms of rhetorical devices.

ACC WORLD LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
ENG 470

ACC: University of Missouri - St. Louis
Level:
12
Duration: Two Semesters - 1 Credit
Description: This course surveys, chronologically, the major literary periods from the Renaissance through the present day. The social, political, philosophical and religious factors that produce literary trends and reactions are emphasized. Our text covers both traditionally "classic" authors as well as newly incorporated authors and works into the canon of Western literature. Additionally, students in this course produce one 10-12 page research paper and write numerous other literary analysis essays.

AP/ACC ENGLISH LITERATURE AND COMPOSITION
ENG 471
AP: Advanced Placement College Board
ACC: St. Louis University 1818
Level:
12
Duration: Two Semesters - 1 Credit
Prerequisites: Admission determined through a screening based on student standing/performance in the following: overall GPA/class rank, reading comprehension scores on the Plan test, verbal scores on the PSAT, first semester junior English grade, a diagnostic evaluation, and teacher recommendation.
Description: This course, for students of superior ability/potential, addresses two primary, though not necessarily parallel, goals: the development of the skills of literary analysis and independent, critical thinking and preparation for credit-earning performance on the AP exam at the end of the year. Close reading and analytical writing, with particular attention to how a writer’s techniques create our understanding of the intended meaning of literature, are the foundation of the course, and this analytical writing is the primary means of evaluation in the course. Literary devices and significant conventions in the genres of poetry, fiction and drama receive particular attention in preparation for the AP exam at the end of the year. Students also write an extensive research paper on a literary topic.

CREATIVE WRITING            
WRI430
Level:
11, 12
Duration: One Semester - ½ Credit
Description: This course provides an opportunity for students to refine their creative writing skills beyond those developed in the required English courses.  Students will explore different ways of conveying meaning through writing to see how methods and styles vary within cultures and time periods. Writing activities and the study of literature are organized by genre, including poetry, short stories, plays, nonfiction (feature articles, etc.) and a multimedia production.  Activities include reading and discussion of models, journaling, free writing, peer conferencing with emphasis placed on revision, and teacher-student conferencing.  A portfolio will serve as the final assessment.

INTRODUCTION TO JOURNALISM          
JRN 430
Level:
11, 12
Duration: One Semester - ½ Credit
Description: Introduction to Journalism is a course designed to teach Chaminade students the basics of non-fiction writing, especially as it is used to explain events, interpret issues, or articulate positions on issues of interest or importance. Students will learn techniques for writing news articles, features, reviews, and opinion editorials; students will also be taught the basic of journalistic responsibility and the importance of a fair, impartial, and meticulous press. While Introduction to Journalism is not a course designed to replace Chaminade’s school newspaper, The Cardinal and White, nor is enrollment in the class a requirement for extra-curricular participation, the course will enhance the skills of student writers, foster opportunities for authentic writing and publication, and encourage engagement with and reflection on current issues and events. Students will evaluate models in terms of both form and content, and will be asked to consider the role of the world-wide-web and other media in constructing news. Introduction to Journalism will provide a collaborative learning environment, one where students introduce article ideas, express opinions, and become more skilled writers.

ACC INTRODUCTION TO FILM                   
FLM 470
ACC: St. Louis University 1818

Level: 11, 12
Duration: One Semester - ½ Credit
Prerequisites: 85% cumulative grade point average, 85% cumulative English grade point average, and teacher recommendation.
Description:
The course will be genre based and focus on style and technique, including, mise-en-scene, cinematography, editing, and sound. The writing will progress from the review toward the research-based scholarly article.